10 Tips for Networking Rehabilitation

By Kim Monaghan

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Kim Monaghan - 10 Tips for Networking Rehabilitation


The word “networking” can make many cringe. Somewhere along the line, this vital process in career advancement garnered a tainted reputation, a few battle scars, and an unjustifiably abused moniker. Perhaps, it stems from those who've misused networking to gain unfair advantages in their graceless quest to climb the corporate ladder. Or maybe networking’s a victim of word association, as it’s often paired with strong arm sales techniques. It could also be that networking is simply misunderstood as just a process of walking up to complete strangers and attempting to carry on an interesting conversation about “whatever.” Regardless of why networking is licking its wounds, it’s still the front-runner for career advancement. 


The best way to move past networking’s tarnished past, is to help it heal. This begins with re-associating this word with it’s true meaning – connecting. People love connecting and thanks to the internet, reaching out to random strangers has, well, become an everyday habit. But the key to truly making networking healthy again is to approach the process respectfully. In other words, adopt a networking approach that’s authentic -- graciously spending time with others, getting to know them, learning from them, asking for advice, assistance and always offering the same in return. Here are a few tips to get the most of out your networking experience, while at the same time, contributing to its rehabilitation.
 

10 Tips for Networking Rehabilitation


1. Ask lots of questions. Help guide the process by coming prepared with targeted questions that keep you both on track and on time.

2. Be a good listener. People love sharing their story and it’s a great way to learn from other’s experience and expertise.

3. Shoot for face-to-face. An in person meeting is more personal, expressive and demonstrates respect for another’s position.

4. Be your best. Show your strengths, but not in a domineering way. People enjoy connecting with others who are “going places” with purpose and pride.

5. Be at your best. Dress for success, be kind and gracious and treat the other person as if they have the authority to hire or promote. They just might. 

6. Respect each other’s time. Be on time, leave on time and don’t abuse someone’s generosity by scheduling too many meetings, unless it’s a mutually agreed upon goal.

7. Ask for referrals. Networking is about connecting and sharing connections. If your contact was gracious enough to share referrals, follow through on contacting them shows respect.

8. Stay positive. Even if you’ve been fired, terminated or facing a work challenge, this is not the time for dumping your woes on others. Focus on the positive and you will leave a positive impression.

9. Say “thanks” and “thanks” again. Thank them for their time, and send them a handwritten thank you note after your meeting.

10. Offer to help. Remember, networking is intended to create a platform for mutually beneficial growth while making people feel good and connected in the process. So look for opportunities to offer something of value in return.
 

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